Tag Archives: planning

Social Media – Prior Post Planning

I am not a spur of the moment person.  I take my time, think things over, have a cup of coffee and think it over again.  My process would seem contrary to the live stream, immediate gratification model of social media.  Social media thrives on the think it post it model where posting occurs while the thought is still in progress and not fully fleshed out.  I sit down most days with the intention of coming up with something witty to post on these global broadcast streams always to come up short.  The question I always ask myself is…”Why would anyone care about this?” The answer most of the time is, “They wouldn’t care.  It’s just digital noise.”

“Why would anyone care?” is a good question to ask before posting.  Just like in video production, social media has an audience, and you need to know who your audience is and what they care about in order for your posting efforts to mean something. Embedding meaning in anything requires some thought, which requires time, which results in seemingly less spontaneity.

To start, take an information inventory of items your audience could be interested in.

  • Upcoming events
  • News articles
  • Videos
  • Pictures
  • Tips

Open up a Word document and write out each item as its own paragraph.   Each paragraph could easily be it’s own Facebook post.  Pared down, most could also be posted on Twitter with an accompanying link.  As a consumer of information I find posts with links most gratifying since Twitter posts in general do not relay much info. With only 140 characters available you have to love your links.

Many of these information nuggets can be reposted in the course of the month.  Why?  Most social media is a news-feed model.  Post it and in no time it moves down the feed, out of site and is replaced by newer information.  Not everyone will see the post the first time you post it.  For timeless information or events that are further out on the calendar you can re-post.

Participating in this inventory exercise at least once a month will get you in the habit of regularly putting your marketing hat on. The exercise need only take an hour or two total to come up with your inventory sheet of posts, complete with relevant links where appropriate.

With list in hand, set a schedule for yourself of what you will post and where.  The rest is just a matter of copy and paste, rinse, repeat.

Copyright Digital Design Digest 2013

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Filed under Project Planning, Social Media

The Field Shoot Backup Plan

Part of planning for any production is identifying your vulnerabilities and having a backup plan should something go wrong.  The last thing you want is to waste a client’s time and money because something did not come together the day of the shoot.  You cannot reasonably afford the overhead of purchasing doubles of all your equipment.  There are, however, some key pieces that are worth the investment of owning multiples and traveling with them during every shoot.

Audio Cords

An item that connects your microphone to your camera or audio mixer.  You would not get sound without it, and it is likely one of the least expensive items you will own in a field setup.  This cord is made of wire and pins that will age over time or is subject to damage from being bent or stepped on.  When it fails you will get static, intermittent sound until you get nothing at all.

On a field shoot bring one cord for each microphone you will use and at least one extra in case there is a failure.  If you can afford it, bring additional cords.  Audio cords can be daisy chained together to provide extra length.

Microphones

If well cared for microphones will last a long time.  You will replace audio cords more frequently.  If your budget allows for it, an extra microphone or two will not only assure you are covered if there is a failure but it will also add a great deal of flexibility to what you can shoot.  There are different microphones for different purposes.  As you add the number of people for whom you need to capture audio you eventually need to add microphones to assure the highest quality sound.  A few extra microphones in the field kit will have you prepared if people are added to a shoot last minute.

Power Supplies

Identify all the gear that requires batteries.  Make sure you travel with extra batteries for each item and that they are fully charged. Don’t use battery power unless you have to.

Always travel with the power cords to your gear and use that as your first option.  Battery power should be reserved for the times when power cords are not an option such as:

  • Tight, crowded spaces where cording is too hazardous.
  • Outdoor footage.
  • Other locations where there is no easy access to an outlet.

Go into each event fully loaded with all of your power options.  Shoots sometime go longer than expected, accidents happen and things get dropped and sometimes atmosphere can drain a battery down more quickly than at other times.  You may have been told outlets were going to be available to you, but then the location changes last minute or it turns out the plug does not work.  Stay flexible by building options into your gear.

Blank Media

Tapes, DVDs, and SD cards. They will fill up quick if a shoot goes longer than planned or there is just more great footage to capture than anticipated.  Sometimes you end up with a lemon that won’t record anything.  You can’t make lemonade out of that.  If you don’t have a backup you don’t have a show.

Tripod Shoes

It is the thing that attaches the camera to the tripod. They are just so small that it is easy to misplace one.  Your backup plan without a tripod would be to film handheld, which would produce shaky video or try to construct a make-shift support last minute which would limit your ability to pan and tilt for shot adjustment.  Better to purchase a second shoe as backup.

In general, it is a good idea to test your gear out once a month and again before every shoot.  You can still address issues the day before a shoot, even if it is to reschedule it because there was a major failure, like your camera.  This is not something you want to discover as you set up for the shoot, if you can avoid it.

Copyright 2013 Digital Design Digest

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Filed under Getting the Right Gear, Project Planning, Video Production

Preparing for a Voice Recording

Whether you are recording a short outgoing message for your company’s phone system or preparing to do a voice over for a video script, consider the following tips for a smoother reading.

  1. Write a full script.  Outlines won’t cut it here.  They leave too many blanks to fill in during the recording when efforts should be put into diction, tone and pace.  Take some pressure off yourself and write out what you want to say verbatim, even for short outgoing phone messages.  This important first step assures you will not leave out any important information.
  2. Proof your script for narration.  Your first instinct will be to write your script like you would write an email or article.  This will not always translate into something that is readable in a narration.  Sentences may be too long and word combinations may be too cumbersome to narrate effectively.  Reading your script out loud will allow you to identify areas that require some additional editing.
  3. Read through the script for tone and pace.  Before recording your script you want to be sure the content is read with the appropriate tone and pace for the content.  This may be consistent throughout the script or change in different places.  It may be helpful to read the script to a handful of trusted people who represent your target audience. There may be some tweaks in an actual recording session but you want to have these details ironed out for the most part before you are ready to record.
  4. Break your script into readable units.  Short phone messages will be pretty easy to get through in one read.  If a mistake is made, just re-read the script as a new recording.  Longer scripts should not be read in one take.  Instead, break the script into short readable units that you can get through in one take.  Then take a break before heading onto the next unit.  If a mistake is made, then re-read that unit until it sounds the way you want.  Your editor can easily blend the units together to read as if no breaks were taken.
  5. A few final thoughts for the day of the recording.  Avoid food and drink that will clog up your vocals.  Dairy, peanut butter, thick sauces and other items create a coating in your throat that can muddy your sound and make it uneven.  Drink hot fluids and water to clear your throat.  Suck on a hard candy to keep your mouth and throat moist before the recording.  Bring a lot of water with you to the recording and make sure to sip it in between takes.  Vocal lubrication is key to a clear, even sound.

Copyright © 2012 Digital Design Digest

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Filed under Project Planning, Video Production